All Due Respect to this Publisher

I have to break from the stream of discussing my favorite individual books of 2014 to discuss a publisher that deserves respect (pun intended) for having a great year. All Due Respect Books put out some of the hottest noir books this year. They brought the novella back to the mainstream with flair and gusto. I really enjoyed their “2-fers” which had two novellas by two different authors under the same cover. I really respect the fact that they kept the pricing of these novellas at a reasonable rate. Mike Monson and Chris Rhatigan are co-publishers at ADR and both are lending a helping hand beyond the publishing aspect by writing some very strong books that are right up my alley.

Below are reviews I published over this year for a few of their books:

You Don’t Exist by Pablo D’Stair and Chris Rhatigan:

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All Due Respect books is coming out swinging with this offering. Both reads from this twin billing offer a great slice of noir.

 

Rhatigan’s offering of Pessimist was a quality read that provides a spin on the “found money” theme. I thought this story was fun to read and it seemed to fly by. The main character Pullman leads a nondescript life until he takes the wrong bag from baggage claim at an airport and finds more than he bargained for inside said bag. Key up the drama, paranoia, and inner conflict and you have a read that is more than enjoyable.

 

D’Stair’s contribution to the book really floored me. It has a tone that reminded me of movie Lost Highway, in so far as you constantly find yourself wondering what is real in the story and what is a figment of the narrator’s imagination. Very cool story. This is what novellas are meant to be.

If this is an indication of where All Due Respect Books is headed, then all noir lovers better hold on tight, because that’s what both of these stories are…tight. I am an instant follower of ADR books and am eager to see what they have in store for us in the future.

 

A Man Alone by David Siddall

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This book begs the question “How far removed are you from the person you used to be?” When John Doyle breaks free from his old life, old habits, and old ways, he thinks he is done being who he used to be. But when pushed too far, he finds that sometimes we are who we are, no matter how much we may deny that fact.

The story was fun to read and was a perfect pace. I will be looking for more books from Siddall in the future.

 

Revenge is a Redhead by Phil Beloin Jr:

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There must be something in the water at All Due Respect Books, because all they seem to do is put out are quick, fun to read books that are written in a ball to the wall style. Revenge is a Redhead keeps the tradition rolling by giving us a story that satisfies the craving for violence, quick pacing, and occasional laughs. This book is the type of book that you can get through in a short amount of time and the pricing is spot on for this type of read. I for one am gobbling up all the offerings from the ADR library and I am enjoying each one. Viva la Respect!

The Scent of New Death by Mike Monson:

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(The book was originally published by Out of the Gutter prior to ADR being formed, but I include it since it is Monson’s book)

There is nothing better than trying a new author, really enjoying the book and realizing they have more you can read. I tried Monson’s book after seeing some solid reviews on various blogs that I hold in high regard when finding books in the vein I enjoy. Monson delivers a solid book with crime, sex, and my favorite, revenge. My only issue with the book is that it was only a novella, so it seemed to be over way too quickly. I am diving into his short stories next and then on to his other novella. Way to go Monson! (He has since put out a novel, Tussinland)

As you can see, I am highly impressed and entertained to what ADR is putting out. They are setting the stage to become a heavy hitter in the world of noir publishing.

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